OTHER WATERS

OTHER WATERS, 2019, is a permanent sculpture installed within Kearsney Abbey Park. The sculpture displays a mould taken of tidal pattern taken during low-tide.


The work is intended to reflect the cultural and ecological processes of the area through a metaphor of change symbolised by the flow of the river and the tide of the sea. The project will also act to connect Kearsney to Dover and the surrounding coastline, and will provide a permanent feature for the parks for years to come

 

 

To be installed Summer 2019

See work in progress images

COMMISSIONED BY DOVER ARTS DEVELOPMENT in assciation with Dover District Council.

pictured; Goodwin Sands ©Elegaer

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Co-Innovation (curatorial project)

CO-INNOVATION, a new centre supporting start-up businesses and community integration in Dover, requires a newly commissioned and curated series of internal and external public artworks reflecting a positive and innovative ethos.

Three sites have been selected for the artworks; twelve external panels on the front facade of the building, eleven concreted external panels around the northern wall of the building, and one large scale internal mural.

The artworks are intended to attract new businesses and promote a positive, progressive, and inclusive message for the Warehouse. We can achieve this though following the three key values of Dover Big Local; To Unify, To Energise, To Inspire. The three project sites each reflect one of these vales and together echo the ethos of Dover Big Local.

 

 

✓Six commissioned artists
✓three open call competitions
✓all submissions included into one large mural
✓investing £2000 paid directly to artists in Dover

 

See the commissioned artworks here.

COMMISSIONED BY DOVER BIG LOCAL

pictured; ©Joanna Jones

CLASSICAL REMAINS

CLASSICAL REMAINS will show work selected from a private collection and explores the influence of classicism through neo-classical and conceptual practices. The exhibition shows work from seven artists, both contemporary and historical. Etchings after the seventeenth century landscape painters Nicolas Poussin and Claude Lorrain explore the resurgence of classism during the Enlightenment and Baroque periods. Ian Hamilton Finlay, an artist inspired by these two artists, used the garden as an artistic medium and his diverse and complex output is widely recognised as a crucial development in 20th century art.

The exhibition also shows work from four living artists. Stephen Bann CBE, FBA is the Emeritus Professor of History of Art at the University of Bristol and University of Kent, Canterbury. Gary Hincks is an illustrator who worked with Ian Hamilton Finlay throughout his life and whose work is included in most major museums around the world. Joseph Black and Antoine Espinasseau are two young contemporary artists working in both painting and sculpture exploring the classical tradition and its relevance today.

EXHIBITING ARTISTS

STEPHEN BANN - JOSEPH BLACK - ANTOINE ESPINASSEAU - IAN HAMILTON FINLAY - GARY HINCKS - CLAUDE LORRAIN - NICOLAS POUSSIN

28-29 APRIL 2018

10-6

CURATED BY JOSEPH BLACK AND MARIEKE VANDEKERCKHOVE

pictured; Antoine Espinasseau

Reflections on the Landscape: Against the tide

Reflections on the Landscape: Against the tide will be the inaugural exhibition held at the recently opened River Garage Studios. The exhibition will show work from nine artists based in Dover.

Each artist voluntarily submitted work to be included in the exhibition. The only criteria for their selection was that they lived and worked in Dover and the surrounding area. As a result their work has been influenced by the unique visual and cultural history of the town. Dover is moulded by its tide, a place always bringing in new life and ideas, as well as a place shaped and defined by its history. It is a town as relevant today as it has ever been. Through bringing these artists together we can reflect on the influence of place and environment on their work; whether economic, cultural, visual or ecological.

EXHIBITING ARTISTS

KATE BEAUGIE - JOSEPH BLACK - DREW BURRETT - SAMUEL CAPELL - PAUL DAGYS - BENJAMIN HUNT - JOANNA JONES - CLARE SMITH - MIKE TEDDER

24-25 February 2018

10-6

CURATED BY JOSEPH BLACK AND LOUISE WEBB 

pictured; Kate Beaugie, Dark Tide, 2017

Asphodels

This photographic series focuses on the enduring motif of the White Asphodel (Asphodelus Albus). The image of the Asphodel Meadows is most associated with Homer’s poetic tradition of describing the meadows of the afterlife.

SOLO EXHIBITION

The Garden at War: Deception, Craft and Reason at Stowe

"An extraordinary, profusely illustrated, impressively informative, thoughtful and thought-provoking study that is unreservedly recommended." - Midwest Book Review

Stowe isn’t a garden of flowers or shrubs; it’s a garden of ideas. This important new collection of essays and artwork brings together reactions from some of the leading thinkers on landscape design, exploring the gardens at Stowe as a site of conflict between order and disorder, and comparing them with Ian Hamilton Finlay’s Little Sparta.

 

Accompanying an exhibition of historic and contemporary art at Stowe House, The Garden at War explores the gardens at Stowe, built by a general, as a site of perpetual conflict. Here the preconditions of destruction and creation are inescapable. If nature is understood to be original, then the garden is an ordered but un-orderly condition – a re-ordered vision of the natural order, a vision of nature disciplined by human action in a attempt to advance and yield control. 

 

At Stowe, two hundred and fifty acres of carefully maintained gardens offer a complex web of views, pathways, statues, inscriptions, urns and ideas. Unlike its French floricultural precursors, Stowe presents sudden shifts of scene, abrupt revelations, as well as spots at which to stop to absorb the visual effect. There is natural beauty in the gardens of Stowe, but they serve a larger purpose than to please the eye. Beneath this facade of bucolic idyll lies a deeply important suggestion of man’s relationship to nature. 

 

Starting with works by the preeminent neoclassical painters Nicolas Poussin and Claude Lorrain – whose distinct pictorial visions gave rise to an unmistakable relationship between the garden, the viewer and the natural world – the publication brings together an arrangement of interpretations and theories exploring metaphors and meanings within the very practice of gardening itself. An introduction by the pre-eminent critic Stephen Bann and essays by Joseph Black and the foremost garden historian John Dixon Hunt lead on to newly commissioned illustrations by artist Gary Hincks, a previously unpublished interview with the Scottish conceptual artist and gardener Ian Hamilton Finlay, and a new discussion of conflict in the work of Richard Long. 

Contributors

 

Joseph Black is an emerging artist and writer; Stephen Bann is Emeritus Professor of History of Art at the University of Bristol and has written extensively on the work of Ian Hamilton Finlay; John Dixon Hunt is Emeritus Professor of the History and Theory of Landscape at the University of Pennsylvania and Harvard Graduate School of Design and is widely acknowledged as a foremost scholar on garden and landscape design; John Stathatos is a Greek writer and photographer specializing in thirdworld conflict; Joy Sleeman is an art historian whose research embraces aspects of the histories of sculpture and landscape design.

EDITED BY JOSEPH BLACK

The Garden at War: Deception, Craft and Reason

Accompanying a publication of the same title and a day-long series of talks by world-leading art historians, The Garden at War explores the gardens at Stowe as a site of metaphors, performance, ideas, and perpetual conflict. The exhibition brings together interpretations from some of the leading thinkers on landscape design, including work from Antoine Espinasseau, Ian Hamilton Finlay, Claude Lorrain and Nicolas Poussin, as well as the exhibition’s Senior Curator Joseph Black. Through these artists work we can explore the gardens at Stowe, as well as Ian Hamilton Finlay’s Little Sparta, as sites of conflict between order and disorder.

Stowe is widely held to be one of the greatest cultural achievements of the eighteenth century, incorporating work from the greatest garden designers of the day, from William Kent to ‘Capability’ Brown. Yet unlike most gardens, Stowe isn’t a garden of flowers or shrubs; it’s a garden of ideas. 250 acres of carefully maintained landscape gardens offer a complex web of views, pathways, statues, inscriptions, urns and ideas. Unlike its French floricultural precursors, Stowe presents sudden shifts of scene, abrupt revelations, as well as spots at which to stop to absorb the visual effect. There is natural beauty in the gardens of Stowe, but they serve a larger purpose than to please the eye. Beneath this facade of bucolic idyll lies a deeply important suggestion of man’s relationship to nature. Like any garden, it must be maintained and its ordered, controlled, and contained vision of nature upheld.

EXHIBITING ARTISTS

JOSEPH BLACK - ANTOINE ESPINASSEAU - IAN HAMILTON FINLAY - CLAUDE LORRAIN - NICOLAS POUSSIN

Stowe House, Buckingham, MK18 5EH
8 July - 9 September 2017

10 - 4 daily

CURATED BY JOSEPH BLACK

The Courtauld Symposium at Stowe 2017

Join us this Summer at Stowe House as The Courtauld Institute of Art presents a day-long series of talks held to open the exhibition The Garden at War.

 

Bringing together world-leading art-historians and contemporary artists the collaborative event aims to provide an enlightening and enjoyable day for all. The talks will explore the issues and ideas raised by the exhibition on the development and relevance of Stowe and its history of neoclassicism.

The primary strand of inquiry which informs the day concerns the work of the Scottish poet and artist Ian Hamilton Finlay and the use of the gardens at Stowe as a collaborative art-form. Looking at Stowe in this manner it is possible to read its design through a number of different frameworks; from the influence of the classical world, to the work of conceptual artists, to the Enlightenment and the French landscape paintings of Nicolas Poussin and Claude Lorrain.

Contributors

 

Joseph Black is an emerging artist and writer; Stephen Bann is Emeritus Professor of History of Art at the University of Bristol and has written extensively on the work of Ian Hamilton Finlay; John Dixon Hunt is Emeritus Professor of the History and Theory of Landscape at the University of Pennsylvania and Harvard Graduate School of Design and is widely acknowledged as a foremost scholar on garden and landscape design; John Stathatos is a Greek writer and photographer specializing in thirdworld conflict; Joy Sleeman is an art historian whose research embraces aspects of the histories of sculpture and landscape design.

Stowe House, Buckingham, MK18 5EH

 Saturday 8 July 2017

 10:30 - 6:00

Booking has now closed

ORGANISED BY JOSEPH BLACK, THE COURTAULD INSTITUTE OF ART AND AGANIPPE ARTS CIC

MARS/GOD OF WAR, 2016

"This new series of photographic works by artist Joseph Black are based around the statue of Mars, the Roman God of War, located in the heart of Paris. With the recent bombing and massacre there in November 2015, it is easy to see these works as a lament for the inevitable connection between war, religion, and their terrible consequences. They seem to present the statue as both dictator and divine presider- as though they are in reality one and the same. In some works the double image of the statue shows this similarity explicitly. The figure looks both ways, or is presented in negative, as if to suggest its meaning, and our understanding of, it is inherently complex and conflicted.
 
Black has said that he was interested '[in] the body posture of the figure, and its confidence; the way it is turned to face away from the viewer with its arms outstretched in this kind of crucifix shape'.

 

The way the images have been constructed suggests at confusion. Black it seems, is ever ready to conflict symbols on information. His use of unidentifiable text and numbers hints at a form of museum cataloguing. He uses this to refer to a form of understanding the world in objective terms, which is inevitably at odds with his use of images of gods. One can even see the reappearance of a dead fly used in one of his earlier works. Black studied early on as a painter and it is easy to see the benefit it has given him in being able to construct these complex compositions.

 

The ripped paper at times resembles landscapes and the text hints at a kind of divine but unidentifiable scripture. The works are remarkably similar to early religious painting, they are in their way almost like religious icons. Yet despite their weighty political and existential connotations, they are remarkably peaceful images. They seem to perfectly summarize the difficult position of religion in today's society and its history of fear, persecution, bloodshed, and beautiful art."

-Robert Lewis

The Lies of Frightened Men, 2015

"Two stone heads face each other like the decapitated skulls from the statues of deposed dictators. A running voice recorder does not record the stone heads supposedly talking into it but instead the real world the viewer inhabits, external to the fictive one in the work. An ‘emergency exit bar’ is placed, frustratingly, just out of reach and therefore denies its use. However, it is not connected to a door and so its height and your frustration in not being able to use it is, partly, unjustified. A dead fly sits a top a tower of paper, a symbol of information, and one is left to question; is it supposed to be there or has the fly fallen there accidentally? An unremarkable dead mouse has been left in the corner of a bottom shelf whilst in another, photos of the same mouse are given pride of place. The whole feeling of the work is of frustration, deception, and entrapment."

Camberwell College of Art

4 - 22 June, 2015

10 - 4